3275 South Jones Blvd., Suite 105
Las Vegas, NV 89146
(702) 307-9500

09/05/2012
Nevada has long recognized that although corporations and LLCs are generally to be treated as separate legal entities, the remedy of "piercing the corporate veil" may be available to a plaintiff in circumstances where it appears that the corporation or LLC is acting as the alter ego of a controlling individual. Third parties have to show personal wrongful conduct on the part of a company official or director to hold them personally responsible; extra-corporate actions which would support application of the legal doctrine known as "piercing the corporate veil."

08/16/2012
Domestic violence is a growing concern not only in the State of Nevada but across the country. Our local police authorities, court systems, and non-profit organizations work hard to educate and protect victims of domestic violence. In Las Vegas, if an act of domestic violence or a threat of domestic violence has occurred, then the victim can apply for a Temporary Protective Order (“TPO”) by filing a verified petition at Family Court located on 601 N. Pecos Road in Las Vegas. A TPO is a Court Order, similar to a restraining order, which can order the defendant to stay away from the victim’s residence, work, child’s school, and/or other address and to refrain from calling, texting, emailing, driving by or showing up at those addresses. Domestic violence involves a person committing an act against his spouse, former spouse, child, relative by blood or marriage, boyfriend/girlfriend, roommate, a person with whom they have a child in common, a minor child of one of the aforementioned people, or the legal guardian of their minor child. NRS 33.018. Domestic violence or a threat of domestic violence can include a battery, assault, sexual assault, unlawful entry into a residence, or a purposeful or reckless course of conduct intended to harass the other person, such as, stalking, arson, trespassing, larceny, destruction of property, carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, or injuring or killing an animal. NRS 33.018.

08/02/2012
I recently underwent surgery. Since one of the potential complications of my surgery may have been death, it got me thinking about all of the things my husband would have to take care of in the event the worst happened. Luckily, the surgery was a resounding success and I am recovering nicely thank you as I am sitting here writing this blog from my computer at the office. However, it did get me thinking about the inevitable someday, which led me to think about whom I would want to get all of my “stuff”. So as I started to take inventory, my thoughts drifted to my “four-legged friends”. I thought what about them, who would get them, who would take care of them, because as hard as it may be for you to believe, your “four-legged friend” is considered personal property in the State of Nevada. This means that when you die, if you have not provided different directions in your Will, your pet is given to your heirs in the same way as your car, bed, or any other tangible property. If you die without a Will then the family could end up fighting over who gets your four-legged friend, or in the worst case scenario no one would even want your four-legged friend and your four-legged friend could be left to fend for himself.

08/02/2012
Let’s say that Bill and Steve have developed new software and they want to start a business and sell the software commercially. So Bill and Steve form a company (doesn’t matter whether it is a Corporation or LLC). They have some money, but not enough to really get the business going. They decide to find additional capital. What are their options: Banks, Lending sources, or Investors. Perhaps, Bill and Steve are smart enough to know that if they sell some ownership in their company to other individuals, they have sold a security. So they decide that they do not want to give up ownership. They contact several Banks and Lenders who don’t seem very interested in loaning Bill and Steve the money they need.

08/02/2012
Let’s say that Bill and Steve have developed new software and they want to start a business and sell the software commercially. So Bill and Steve form a company (doesn’t matter whether it is a Corporation or LLC). They have some money, but not enough to really get the business going. They decide to find additional capital. What are their options: Banks, Lending sources, or Investors. Perhaps, Bill and Steve are smart enough to know that if they sell some ownership in their company to other individuals, they have sold a security. So they decide that they do not want to give up ownership. They contact several Banks and Lenders who don’t seem very interested in loaning Bill and Steve the money they need.

06/19/2012
What is equitable subrogation you ask? Let me illustrate. Lets say on January 1, 2005, Bank #1 loaned a Developer $1,000,000 to build a shopping center, with the note secured by a Deed of Trust on the Property. Then, lets say the Contractor hired by Developer to build the shopping center began its work of improvement on February 1, 2006. Then, lets say on July 1, 2006, Bank #2 loaned the Developer $2,000,000, with the note secured by a Deed of Trust on the Property as well. Bank #2 is claiming it refinanced, thereby paying off, Bank #1's January 1, 2005 loan. Then, lets say Contractor does not get paid by the Developer, and as a result records a mechanic's lien on the Property for $2,000,000 on December 1, 2007. The Contractor is claiming because commencement of construction began well before July 1, 2006, his mechanic's lien has priority over Bank #2's loan. Bank #2 is claiming because it paid off Bank #1, under the theory of "equitable subrogation", it can leap-frog over Contractor's priority of lien to the Property. So, WHO'S ON FIRST?

05/23/2012
It seems you cannot turn on one of our local news stations without hearing about another pedestrian being injured by a motor vehicle. Clark County has had an increased number of pedestrian accidents in recent months and is frequently listed as a one of the worst cities for traffic related injuries and accidents. Pedestrian accidents can cause severe injuries, including but not limited to, sprains, fractures, loss of limbs, and death. It is important for not only our drivers but also our pedestrians to understand the “Rules of the Road.”

05/10/2012
Nevada provides a mechanism for general contractors and subcontractors to file a lien against real property in order to secure payment for materials provided or services rendered to a property owner. These liens may variously be referred to as a “construction lien,” “mechanic’s lien,” or a “materialman’s lien.” The intent is that those owners whose real property has been improved should pay for the labor and materials delivered and incorporated into the real property.

04/25/2012
The 2011 Legislature passed the Independent Administration of Estates Act. This Act allows the individual appointed to administer the Decedent’s Estate, whether they are Executor or Administrator, to take a number of actions without the permission of the Court once the Executor/Administrator has been granted full authority to administer the Estate under this Act.

04/16/2012
If you are an Employer undoubtedly you have used or encountered a Confidentiality and Nondisclosure Agreement, which also goes by the name Confidentiality and Intellectual Property Rights Agreement.